It's Not Her Fault!

February 28, 2017 @ 03:08 pm by Daniel Kessel

Why do some people believe that the creation myth suggests that women are inferior to men? In this episode of That'll Preach Jacqui Lewis reflects on Genesis 2.15-17 and Genesis 3.1-7, asking us to rethink any place where a piece of scripture is associated with inequality, sexism, or racism. To hear more from this text join us this Sunday in the East Village or online at www.MiddleChurch.org every Sunday at 11:15 AM.

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Episode Transcript:

Intro: I think it's actually a spiritual practice to be rewiring our thinking any place we think scripture is leading us to think of others as less than we are, as inferior.

I'm Jacqui Lewis, the senior minister at Middle Collegiate Church, and you're listening to That'll Preach—a show that's one part sermon prep and one part devotional. And the next episode starts right now. Here we go!

Today I'm going to be talking with you about the two creation stories that are found in Genesis (Genesis 2 15-17 and Genesis 3 1-7). I'm calling my sermon "It's Not Her Fault." You know, I think so much of human society is hard-wired that women are inferior to men because of this text. In fact, my friend says that this is fallen theology. Just because Eve disobeyed God and listened to the advice of a talking snake, and Eve eats the fruit and Adam follows suit because men love to follow women (pay attention to the women's march—I digress) So here we have, just because Eve eats first, she somehow causes Adam to fall and therefore women are inferior to men.

Does that make any sense to you? If God is the designer of the universe, if God is the creator, would God create on purpose a species who would be told not to eat fruit and then eat it? No. God knows that they're going to eat the fruit and they eat the fruit. In fact, Rabbi Kushner says the people eating the fruit is a metaphor for the people moving from the animal kingdom to humanness. In other words, this is a parable about evolution.

If that's true, we could think about an Ethiopian creation myth—yes, I said myth on purpose—an Ethiopian creation myth where there's a two-sided being that's created and they move through time and they lose each other and then in the end of time they find each other. Some people think maybe this creation story about Adam going to sleep and Eve being pulled out of his side relates to that Ethiopian myth

So what? What does it mean? I think it's actually a spiritual practice to be rewiring our thinking any place we think scripture is leading us to think of others as less than we are, as inferior. It's a spiritual practice to examine these texts that are used to make us bake in inequality or bake in racism, and so I'm inviting us to think about it that way. Think about it.

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That'll Preach, a podcast with Jacqui Lewis: part sermon-prep, part devotional.

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